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Has anyone had to change the timing belt on their Fiesta? I'm curious as to this costly repair.

Did you do it yourself? How much and How long does it take?
Did you do it at the dealer? How much?

How often is the timing belt to be replaced anyways? 60,000mi? 100,000mi.

can anyone answer these questions.

I'm liking the ecoboost Fiesta engine. Yeah it will cost likely a $1000 more, but better gas mileage and if you will never have to pay for costly iming belt replacements even better. It is to use a belt bathed in engine oil that will not need to be replaced.

I drive upwards of 40,000mi/yr. so when I buy a car it better last me 200kmi to 250mi to get my money out of it. I cant be trading a car in every few years with that mileage on it. I just can't stand having to spend extra money on maintainence simply because the automaker clearly built and inferior product. With the cost of vehicles and reliability being good there is no reason why any vehicle should use a timing belt. most automakers are going away from them because it is simply almost impossible to change without tearing half the stuff from the engine compartment.
 

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Honestly, a timing belt is better to have than a chain. I am a mechanic, and it is fairly simple to replace a timing belt. The problem with a chain is that the chain might not wear out, but the guides will, and they need replacing at about the same time as a timing belt. Chains are also more complicated and usually more expensive.
 

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Has anyone had to change the timing belt on their Fiesta? I'm curious as to this costly repair.

Did you do it yourself? How much and How long does it take?
Did you do it at the dealer? How much?

How often is the timing belt to be replaced anyways? 60,000mi? 100,000mi.

can anyone answer these questions.

I'm liking the ecoboost Fiesta engine. Yeah it will cost likely a $1000 more, but better gas mileage and if you will never have to pay for costly iming belt replacements even better. It is to use a belt bathed in engine oil that will not need to be replaced.

I drive upwards of 40,000mi/yr. so when I buy a car it better last me 200kmi to 250mi to get my money out of it. I cant be trading a car in every few years with that mileage on it. I just can't stand having to spend extra money on maintainence simply because the automaker clearly built and inferior product. With the cost of vehicles and reliability being good there is no reason why any vehicle should use a timing belt. most automakers are going away from them because it is simply almost impossible to change without tearing half the stuff from the engine compartment.
Owner's manual says every 150,000 mi
 

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Serpentine (FEAD) Belt Causing Timing Issue (2011 Fiesta SE)

Has anyone had to change the timing belt on their Fiesta? I'm curious as to this costly repair.

Did you do it yourself? How much and How long does it take?
Did you do it at the dealer? How much?

How often is the timing belt to be replaced anyways? 60,000mi? 100,000mi.

can anyone answer these questions.

I'm liking the ecoboost Fiesta engine. Yeah it will cost likely a $1000 more, but better gas mileage and if you will never have to pay for costly iming belt replacements even better. It is to use a belt bathed in engine oil that will not need to be replaced.

I drive upwards of 40,000mi/yr. so when I buy a car it better last me 200kmi to 250mi to get my money out of it. I cant be trading a car in every few years with that mileage on it. I just can't stand having to spend extra money on maintainence simply because the automaker clearly built and inferior product. With the cost of vehicles and reliability being good there is no reason why any vehicle should use a timing belt. most automakers are going away from them because it is simply almost impossible to change without tearing half the stuff from the engine compartment.

To answer your questions:

1. Timing belt change is not too difficult. I just did this myself after a serpentine belt failure altered the timing of my engine (see description below). It took roughly 4 hours in total keeping in mind I had a beer or two while doing it and accidentally broke the alternator wire off at the connector when trying to remove it. The belt itself only costs $35 or so from your local Ford dealer. You need to buy the timing kit. It should come with a TDC pin and a laser-cut steel bracket to set the timing between the cam phasers. There are a few places online you can rent these items for about $100 bucks or buy for $150.

Things to know:
1. The 2011 1.6L engine is "interference free" according to the dealer mechanics and my experience (engine went out of time with no damage) so if you wait until the belt fails it does not mean a total rebuild.
2. The crankshaft pulley and timing belt cog is keyless and relies solely on friction between the crankshaft pulley, belt cog, and crankshaft to run in time with cams. Good thing the engine is "interference free"!
3. Because of keyless crankshaft pulley, having the timing kit is critical as there is no other way to absolutely set #1 TDC and cam timing since it is infinitely variable.
4. Crankshaft pulley bolt is not actually that difficult to remove... which is surprising considering point 2. A regular strap wrench and a 1/2" cheater bar broke it loose. Note that once you remove this bolt and the friction is gone, your engine timing cannot be guaranteed without the timing kit.
5. ChiltonDIY has an excellent online guide for this process and a one-year pass is only like $30 bucks. Money well spent if you're going to doing this yourself.

Here's what lead me to have to do this repair (WARNING ON SERPENTINE/ FEAD BELT WEAR)

1. Serpentine belt failed while driving. While driving I noticed a tapping/ clicking sound that I thought might be the engine coming apart. Turns out it was pieces of belt flapping against engine componentry. Belt separated along belt midline.
2. Inside portion of belt wrapped around crankshaft between crankshaft pulley and lower timing belt cover.
3. Unfortunately I did not know this was true so decided to try to make it home before belt snapped completely since remaining section was still driving my alternator and water pump.
4. Belt melted through timing belt cover and contacted timing belt cog. Belt segment lodged between lower timing belt cover and cog causing crankshaft to rotate free from timing cog OR timing belt may have skipped. Again, did not know this at the time.
5. Car shuddered and died while I was in the middle of the intersection! Towed home to discover points 2-4.
6. After removing parts required to get behind crankshaft pulley, installed timing kit to find crank was about 45 degrees out of time from cams but cams were still in time with each other. This validated the theory that my crankshaft had spun free from valve train.
7. Replaced timing belt while apart (car has 90k miles) in case any teeth were damaged.
8. Fired up without incident after repair was complete.

It turns out the FEAD/Serpentine belt drive in this vehicle is a "single position" belt drive meaning there is no tensioner. While this does help to cut cost it can lead to the series of failures I have listed. That said, don't be an idiot like me and replace that belt when the dealer recommends... Or at any sight of wear/ aging.

Hope this helps. Please email or respond if you have questions.

Jake
 

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To answer your questions:

1. Timing belt change is not too difficult. I just did this myself after a serpentine belt failure altered the timing of my engine (see description below). It took roughly 4 hours in total keeping in mind I had a beer or two while doing it and accidentally broke the alternator wire off at the connector when trying to remove it. The belt itself only costs $35 or so from your local Ford dealer. You need to buy the timing kit. It should come with a TDC pin and a laser-cut steel bracket to set the timing between the cam phasers. There are a few places online you can rent these items for about $100 bucks or buy for $150.

Things to know:
1. The 2011 1.6L engine is "interference free" according to the dealer mechanics and my experience (engine went out of time with no damage) so if you wait until the belt fails it does not mean a total rebuild.
2. The crankshaft pulley and timing belt cog is keyless and relies solely on friction between the crankshaft pulley, belt cog, and crankshaft to run in time with cams. Good thing the engine is "interference free"!
3. Because of keyless crankshaft pulley, having the timing kit is critical as there is no other way to absolutely set #1 TDC and cam timing since it is infinitely variable.
4. Crankshaft pulley bolt is not actually that difficult to remove... which is surprising considering point 2. A regular strap wrench and a 1/2" cheater bar broke it loose. Note that once you remove this bolt and the friction is gone, your engine timing cannot be guaranteed without the timing kit.
5. ChiltonDIY has an excellent online guide for this process and a one-year pass is only like $30 bucks. Money well spent if you're going to doing this yourself.

Here's what lead me to have to do this repair (WARNING ON SERPENTINE/ FEAD BELT WEAR)

1. Serpentine belt failed while driving. While driving I noticed a tapping/ clicking sound that I thought might be the engine coming apart. Turns out it was pieces of belt flapping against engine componentry. Belt separated along belt midline.
2. Inside portion of belt wrapped around crankshaft between crankshaft pulley and lower timing belt cover.
3. Unfortunately I did not know this was true so decided to try to make it home before belt snapped completely since remaining section was still driving my alternator and water pump.
4. Belt melted through timing belt cover and contacted timing belt cog. Belt segment lodged between lower timing belt cover and cog causing crankshaft to rotate free from timing cog OR timing belt may have skipped. Again, did not know this at the time.
5. Car shuddered and died while I was in the middle of the intersection! Towed home to discover points 2-4.
6. After removing parts required to get behind crankshaft pulley, installed timing kit to find crank was about 45 degrees out of time from cams but cams were still in time with each other. This validated the theory that my crankshaft had spun free from valve train.
7. Replaced timing belt while apart (car has 90k miles) in case any teeth were damaged.
8. Fired up without incident after repair was complete.

It turns out the FEAD/Serpentine belt drive in this vehicle is a "single position" belt drive meaning there is no tensioner. While this does help to cut cost it can lead to the series of failures I have listed. That said, don't be an idiot like me and replace that belt when the dealer recommends... Or at any sight of wear/ aging.

Hope this helps. Please email or respond if you have questions.

Jake
Ford says the belt should be changed at 150,000 but the manufacturer of the belt says 60,000 I believe the belt guys since my serpentine has already gone out @ 45,000 and it shouldnt need replacing till 150,000
 

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need to change the belt every 60,000 by belt manufacturer dealer says 150,000 my serpentine popped at 40,000 dealer shows 150,000 should last if its interfeance change it
 

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Hello Jake, something just happened to me. My serpentine belt went bad and wrapped around the crankshaft causing my timing to go off. My cam shafts are in the same position but when I place cylinder one in top dead center the camshafts marking on the pulley don't center at 12 o'clock. I was wondering if the website you mentioned in your post gives you detail explanation on how to put the camshafts back to position.
 

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Has anyone had to change the timing belt on their Fiesta? I'm curious as to this costly repair.

Did you do it yourself? How much and How long does it take?
Did you do it at the dealer? How much?

How often is the timing belt to be replaced anyways? 60,000mi? 100,000mi.

can anyone answer these questions.

I'm liking the ecoboost Fiesta engine. Yeah it will cost likely a $1000 more, but better gas mileage and if you will never have to pay for costly iming belt replacements even better. It is to use a belt bathed in engine oil that will not need to be replaced.

I drive upwards of 40,000mi/yr. so when I buy a car it better last me 200kmi to 250mi to get my money out of it. I cant be trading a car in every few years with that mileage on it. I just can't stand having to spend extra money on maintainence simply because the automaker clearly built and inferior product. With the cost of vehicles and reliability being good there is no reason why any vehicle should use a timing belt. most automakers are going away from them because it is simply almost impossible to change without tearing half the stuff from the engine compartment.

To answer your questions:

1. Timing belt change is not too difficult. I just did this myself after a serpentine belt failure altered the timing of my engine (see description below). It took roughly 4 hours in total keeping in mind I had a beer or two while doing it and accidentally broke the alternator wire off at the connector when trying to remove it. The belt itself only costs $35 or so from your local Ford dealer. You need to buy the timing kit. It should come with a TDC pin and a laser-cut steel bracket to set the timing between the cam phasers. There are a few places online you can rent these items for about $100 bucks or buy for $150.

Things to know:
1. The 2011 1.6L engine is "interference free" according to the dealer mechanics and my experience (engine went out of time with no damage) so if you wait until the belt fails it does not mean a total rebuild.
2. The crankshaft pulley and timing belt cog is keyless and relies solely on friction between the crankshaft pulley, belt cog, and crankshaft to run in time with cams. Good thing the engine is "interference free"!
3. Because of keyless crankshaft pulley, having the timing kit is critical as there is no other way to absolutely set #1 TDC and cam timing since it is infinitely variable.
4. Crankshaft pulley bolt is not actually that difficult to remove... which is surprising considering point 2. A regular strap wrench and a 1/2" cheater bar broke it loose. Note that once you remove this bolt and the friction is gone, your engine timing cannot be guaranteed without the timing kit.
5. ChiltonDIY has an excellent online guide for this process and a one-year pass is only like $30 bucks. Money well spent if you're going to doing this yourself.

Here's what lead me to have to do this repair (WARNING ON SERPENTINE/ FEAD BELT WEAR)

1. Serpentine belt failed while driving. While driving I noticed a tapping/ clicking sound that I thought might be the engine coming apart. Turns out it was pieces of belt flapping against engine componentry. Belt separated along belt midline.
2. Inside portion of belt wrapped around crankshaft between crankshaft pulley and lower timing belt cover.
3. Unfortunately I did not know this was true so decided to try to make it home before belt snapped completely since remaining section was still driving my alternator and water pump.
4. Belt melted through timing belt cover and contacted timing belt cog. Belt segment lodged between lower timing belt cover and cog causing crankshaft to rotate free from timing cog OR timing belt may have skipped. Again, did not know this at the time.
5. Car shuddered and died while I was in the middle of the intersection! Towed home to discover points 2-4.
6. After removing parts required to get behind crankshaft pulley, installed timing kit to find crank was about 45 degrees out of time from cams but cams were still in time with each other. This validated the theory that my crankshaft had spun free from valve train.
7. Replaced timing belt while apart (car has 90k miles) in case any teeth were damaged.
8. Fired up without incident after repair was complete.

It turns out the FEAD/Serpentine belt drive in this vehicle is a "single position" belt drive meaning there is no tensioner. While this does help to cut cost it can lead to the series of failures I have listed. That said, don't be an idiot like me and replace that belt when the dealer recommends... Or at any sight of wear/ aging.

Hope this helps. Please email or respond if you have questions.

Jake
Hello Jake I posted a question on the forum if you can please reply. New to the forum so learning how it works.
 
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