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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Replacing any of the bulbs on either headlamp assembly involves removing the complete housing first. What happened to the days when you could just remove a bulb from the backside of the headlamp by sticking your head under the hood? I've studied the diagrams in the manual, and I get the sinking feeling that this is not going to be a simple operation when the time comes. One wrong step, and the potential is definitely there for having to buy a lot more than just a new halogen bulb. Especially if a bulb burns out in very cold weather, when plastics of all kinds become super brittle and can crack/break without warning.

Our '05 Focus SES went 124,873 miles without burning out a single bulb anyplace on the front end. And we only had to replace one brakelight bulb on the RR of the car in all that time. Maybe our new Fiesta will do as well. I really hope so, because if anything does burn out on the front end (in or out of warranty), I am taking this car straight to the dealership for replacement.

In the long run, it will be considerably cheaper than having to buy a whole new headlamp housing because I accidentally broke off a clip/fastener/etc. while trying to save some money on labor charges.

When it comes to replacing bulbs (or anything else on their cars), the more capable "Do-It-Yourself" Fiesta owners will probably be ok with tackling the job. As for me, however, I'm still going to err on the side of caution.

Harry
 

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I have to remove the headlight assembly to change a bulb on my chevy truck too. No problem, since there are two pins that easily pull out and drop back in. It can't be that hard. It's probably one of those things that looks bad until you actually do it. Then you sit back and think; "What was I worried about?" :eek:
 

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removing the headlamp is very easy, and so is the tail lamp. 2 screws, a christmas tree clip, and its done. I used to swap headlamps out on my ZX3 for summer/winter so I would not chip my blacked out housings in the winter. It would only take me a minute to swap both lenses. The Fiesta comes apart much easier. Besides, the good old days had sealed beams which had to be remove by taking out a bezel. Most of the time, the screws were rusted in place and would strip. New cars are very easy to work on, come apart good, and are a breeze to put back together.
 

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That's good to know. It did seem that the left headlamp's position right next to the fuse box would make it difficult to change the bulb without removing the headlamp assembly.

In a VW Golf that I used to have, it was just barely possible to change the low beam bulb without taking the headlamp assembly out; the high beam and turn signal bulbs required longer and more flexible hands than most of the human population had. Removing the headlamp assembly apparently required removing the bumper, according to some forum chatter.

However, the real prize is the Renault Megane:
 

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removing the headlamp is very easy, and so is the tail lamp. 2 screws, a christmas tree clip, and its done. I used to swap headlamps out on my ZX3 for summer/winter so I would not chip my blacked out housings in the winter. It would only take me a minute to swap both lenses. The Fiesta comes apart much easier. Besides, the good old days had sealed beams which had to be remove by taking out a bezel. Most of the time, the screws were rusted in place and would strip. New cars are very easy to work on, come apart good, and are a breeze to put back together.
yeah sealed beams are awesome... not. my 92 [Saturn] SC and 96 SC2 had pop-up headlamps with sealed beams and you needed both a torx and phillips to replace them. I replaced the sealed beams with Hella H4 kits. my 02 SC2 headlamps had bulbs that were easy to replace without tools.
 

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yeah sealed beams are awesome... not. my 92 [Saturn] SC and 96 SC2 had pop-up headlamps with sealed beams and you needed both a torx and phillips to replace them. I replaced the sealed beams with Hella H4 kits. my 02 SC2 headlamps had bulbs that were easy to replace without tools.
I got tired of the sealed beams on my Mustang and bought a set of H4 conversion lights. The conversion was easy, but getting the rusted screws off the bezels sucked. Most had to be drilled out since the heads broke off. New cars are so much better to work on.
 

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If I remember correctly, the tail-light assys. also have to be
removed in order to change the bulbs.
 

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If I remember correctly, the tail-light assys. also have to be
removed in order to change the bulbs.
correct, but that is silly easy. It takes me longer to pull off all the plastic trim on my Mustang to get to the bulbs than it does to remove the entire Fiesta taillamp assembly and all the bulbs. All you need a T25 Torx.
 

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I have an old car with sealed beam headlamps. I replaced the low beam ones with GE Nighthawk sealed beam headlamps (had to mail order them). They produce a much better beam pattern than other sealed beam headlamps, at a much lower cost than the H4 conversions that one had to use to get a good beam pattern before the Nighthawks became available.
 

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To change headlights in a Civic, you have to take the front wheel off, then the molding, then reach in a deep dark hole. fun fun. But to change the tail lights (on a coupe like mine), you have to take the whole bumper off! I put aftermarket LED's in mine, and it took me almost 3 hours.... Never again!
 

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The Fiesta uses H11b bulbs......nobody makes H11b HID kits, damn.
 

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I can't wait till there is a huge aftermarket for this car! I want/need LED tail lights, since I LOVE them haha :p
 

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The Fiesta uses H11b bulbs......nobody makes H11b HID kits, damn.
The general consensus is that HID kits that only replace the bulb tend to produce a poor beam pattern that, while possibly giving the driver decent light to see by (because of the large amount of light produced), gives excessive glare to other drivers who then become more likely to crash into you because they have a hard time seeing.

Better if someone made an HID kit with properly designed reflectors and lenses (obviously, this would replace the headlamp assembly rather than just the bulb) to produce a good beam pattern that gives improved seeing light for the driver while minimizing glare to other drivers.
 

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The general consensus is that HID kits that only replace the bulb tend to produce a poor beam pattern that, while possibly giving the driver decent light to see by (because of the large amount of light produced), gives excessive glare to other drivers who then become more likely to crash into you because they have a hard time seeing.

Better if someone made an HID kit with properly designed reflectors and lenses (obviously, this would replace the headlamp assembly rather than just the bulb) to produce a good beam pattern that gives improved seeing light for the driver while minimizing glare to other drivers.
While it may be plug n play, you still have to aim your beams, most people just don't do that.
 
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