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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone! I have a 2016 fiesta S, 1.6l Ti-VCT, 5 speed manual. So far I have lowered it on Megan Racing lowering springs, put on Basset Racing rims with Nitto Neogen tires, installed a JMS Chip Pedalmax to eliminate throttle lag, Mountune poly engine mount, and Alex The Machinist aluminum power steering bushings. Interior I have the OES rubber floor mats, a Hurst pistol grip shifter, and a suede boot with blue stitching. I work as a service manager at a European repair shop and also have a ton of my own tools including a MIG welder. My next venture is to add on an Aisin AMR500 supercharger to get hopefully a 30-40% gain in power. My guys at the shop agree that if I limit the boost to 6PSI I should be able to run the stock engine with no modifications or supplemental fuel. I have a wide band AFR gauge that I'll be running to make sure I don't run too lean, as well as a Tial 6PSI BOV. The charge air will be run through a Mishimoto z-line intercooler and I'll be making my own piping to fit the custom application. It's amazing that this engine doesn't have a MAF and only has a MAP because it will make it that much easier to add boost without making the engine mad. I will be lightening the interior as much as possible and with the added HP my goal is to be competitive with the power to weight ratio of a Civic SI. Please let me know if you've ever done anything like this before. I've seen some crazy tuners in Indonesia who've been supercharging Fiestas but there doesn't appear to be anyone in the US who's done it. I don't need to be told "You're gonna blow up your engine" I work in a shop so worst case scenario I'll just get a new engine. Feedback is welcome! :)
 

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Welcome aboard man!

Are you located Stateside or in Europe?

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Western Maryland.

The only issue you're going to run into with your plan is the same issue we've had since like day 1 with the US Spec Fiesta - there is no tuning available for the non-turbo 1.6 litre engine we have in them. A supercharger would be awesome - but you aren't going to see any usable gains in power without a tune.

The 1.6 litre turbo in the ST uses a different ECU which has been unlocked for tuning. The European models all use a different ECU that allows for tuning as well. But the US Spec non-turbo 1.6 was never seen as a worthwhile venture for any American tuning company so we were kind of left by the wayside.

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, let's get into engine theory, my favorite subject! My question to you is has anyone tried it? I watched this video ==> How a Ti-VCT engine works which is super helpful in understanding the science behind the Ti-VCT system. Best as I can understand the PCM is able to advance intake timing and retard exhaust timing. While Ford did put a good bit of money into developing this system it is still relatively simple. A comparable engine would be any of the Toyota 4 cylinder dual VVT engines and those have had forced induction added for quite some time. The PCM is only designed to adjust timing to deliver optimal torque, horsepower, or fuel economy based on the needs of the current situation. Due to the fact that it doesn't have a MAF, it is only interested in the pressure at the manifold and is using that information to adjust the AFR. It seems that the Ti-VCT portion of the system is really only responding to the cam position sensors and the crank position sensor which have variable readings under load but don't correspond to the portion of the PCM in charge of fuel management. This indicates to me that by adding 6 PSI of boost there would indeed be a higher volume of air entering the engine, and the increased pressure reading from the MAP sensor will result in a larger amount of fuel delivered to the cylinders. What this means for the Ti-VCT engine, I believe, is that you will have a bigger boom and more vroom because there will be a larger quantity of air in each cylinder. I could be totally wrong, but based on the fact that people can add a shot of wet nitrous, which is an oxidizer and has the same scientific effect as boost, and the nitrous works, the boost should work too. I'm not afraid to take one for the team to try this theory and will be reporting every step of the way to let you all know how it goes. I believe I will see a change in AFR on my wide band gauge when the 6PSI of boost is added. Since there isn't any sort of system that can impede air flow (like intake manifold runner flaps in VAG and Mercedes engines), this should work. Thanks!
 

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I really can't even pretend to know a ton about the theoretically limits of these engines. Heh. I mean - Mountune and Cosworth build these 1.6 blocks up to something insane like 6 - 700 hp in open rally spec. But I've owned my Fiesta since October 2010 and I can tell you that plenty of OGs have tried. It was a really promising platform to start with - those of us who came from owning a Focus imagined it to be the spiritual successor to the mk1 Focus.

The issue here isn't so much the inner workings of the engine and the variable cams as it is the electronic brain running it all. Ford tuned the engine and fuel trim on these cars for economy and pretty much nothing else. You can only pump so much additional air into the cylinders before the top of the expected curve is reached in the ECU and it doesn't know how to handle the extra volume - while it would be nice, it's not exponential.

Side note - I'm pretty certain we DO have a MAF on the Fiesta. It's mounted to the lid of the airbox no?

But back your theory - I imagine you will see a change in AFR up to a point where the cams have done all they can and the injectors are pumping the most fuel the management system will allow them to and then you'll hit a ceiling past which any additional boost will return no gains. With the way the Fiesta is tuned from the factory, I - sadly - imagine that ceiling to be pretty low.

That is the whole idea behind tuning the car and engine - you are enhancing the cars knowledge of how to handle the parameters for air, fuel, spark and timing that it is being presented with. If it only knows how to go to '5' on fuel and air and you give it '7' on air, it's still only going to give you '5' on fuel and that extra air is just wasted.

But again - this is all theory on both our parts so please - if you have the time and knowhow, give it a go for science!

For a reference point - as a very early adopter of the Fiesta - I dynoed the car stock in June of 2011 and make 110hp and 110 ft lbs. Which impressed a few of those present as Ford only rated it as 120hp (assumed to be at the flywheel) and there is usually at least a 10% loss between flywheel and drivetrain. The power was fine for me as what I really cared about were the handling charactistics.

In the 10 years of ownership I have swapped in essentially an entire ST suspension (control arms, rear torsion beam, knuckles, springs, shocks, brakes) and upgraded my intake with a European ST200 box and my exhaust with a custom high flow header and ST cat back. Very happy with the point I am at for driveability. Love this car!

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Okay, let's get into engine theory, my favorite subject! My question to you is has anyone tried it? I watched this video ==> How a Ti-VCT engine works which is super helpful in understanding the science behind the Ti-VCT system. Best as I can understand the PCM is able to advance intake timing and retard exhaust timing. While Ford did put a good bit of money into developing this system it is still relatively simple. A comparable engine would be any of the Toyota 4 cylinder dual VVT engines and those have had forced induction added for quite some time. The PCM is only designed to adjust timing to deliver optimal torque, horsepower, or fuel economy based on the needs of the current situation. Due to the fact that it doesn't have a MAF, it is only interested in the pressure at the manifold and is using that information to adjust the AFR. It seems that the Ti-VCT portion of the system is really only responding to the cam position sensors and the crank position sensor which have variable readings under load but don't correspond to the portion of the PCM in charge of fuel management. This indicates to me that by adding 6 PSI of boost there would indeed be a higher volume of air entering the engine, and the increased pressure reading from the MAP sensor will result in a larger amount of fuel delivered to the cylinders. What this means for the Ti-VCT engine, I believe, is that you will have a bigger boom and more vroom because there will be a larger quantity of air in each cylinder. I could be totally wrong, but based on the fact that people can add a shot of wet nitrous, which is an oxidizer and has the same scientific effect as boost, and the nitrous works, the boost should work too. I'm not afraid to take one for the team to try this theory and will be reporting every step of the way to let you all know how it goes. I believe I will see a change in AFR on my wide band gauge when the 6PSI of boost is added. Since there isn't any sort of system that can impede air flow (like intake manifold runner flaps in VAG and Mercedes engines), this should work. Thanks!
You can research all you want, but ECU support for NA Fiestas is simply not there. The cost is prohibitive for the average builder. If you have the money to throw at it, by all means... do what you’re wanting to do. Quite frankly, you’d yield close to the same result with a 75hp wet shot.


2014 Ford Fiesta SE Hatchback
Cold Air Intake
OBX Header with high-flo cat, resonator, and DC Sports muffler and 2.5” exhaust
N2MB Two Step
FRPP Suspension
17” Focal with 205/45s
3M Dark Smoke Vinyl Wrapped Lights
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dean72, thank you for your input, in light of my research and what you guys are saying, I think I would be much better off going with a wet nitrous system. I found this Wet shot system which is quite affordable and looks like a lot of fun. I have a dumb question though, how and when exactly do you USE nitrous? A boosted system is boosting all the time, but the nitrous has a finite amount, so how do you properly use it? Sorry for the n00b question, I've just never used nitrous before.
 

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Dean72, thank you for your input, in light of my research and what you guys are saying, I think I would be much better off going with a wet nitrous system. I found this Wet shot system which is quite affordable and looks like a lot of fun. I have a dumb question though, how and when exactly do you USE nitrous? A boosted system is boosting all the time, but the nitrous has a finite amount, so how do you properly use it? Sorry for the n00b question, I've just never used nitrous before.
Wide open throttle above 2500rpm. You’d do well to talk with a few nitrous suppliers for info. YouTube is a good source as well.


2014 Ford Fiesta SE Hatchback
Cold Air Intake
OBX Header with high-flo cat, resonator, and DC Sports muffler and 2.5” exhaust
N2MB Two Step
FRPP Suspension
17” Focal with 205/45s
3M Dark Smoke Vinyl Wrapped Lights
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Awesome, I'm gonna go ahead with that then. The boss just gave me approval (my wife :ROFLMAO:) I'll make a separate, pic-heavy thread of the install!
 
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